(Poem) Come Eat My Roses/ the Feminine Renewal Calls By Louisa Calio

Louisa Calio, Poet

I’ve seen the horrors of the wasteland yet to come

The famine spoken of

I believed I was bound to repeat them.

But frustration screamed rivers

Rivers running through my bloodstream.

Ferocious as the forest fire in high winds

I seering, seering, Saw

I can make nothing better by speech alone

Risking as I speak, -the madness.

 

Consciousness is not a constant thing

Though a continuous vigil.

 

Ours is a time of sewer landscapes

Removed as we on concrete shores

From the truths nature teaches.

I’ve seen the miniature

The smaller canvas in you and I

Mirrors turned to doubles

To see in four to the other side.

Dual dilemmas

Dialectical pulls

Rip through my heart.

I follow through

Pushed down to the deepest dark

Past the guarded secrets I am led

Guided by the Old Mysteries

I am vomited up again

In relief, I traverse the earth.

 

To  see you, see you clearly

See you in peace or see you in war

I see you are at the crossroads.

You may go the terrible way,

by the light of  the blood burning sun

We may become, scorched earth in famine and drought

If you deny the forces of water

If you kill the rain making powers

The sources of moisture! The feminine powers!

Paused at the brink,

You are the final link caught in reason

Dying to believe only what you see in concrete

A masculine bias.

 

This epic has been told and retold

before the Hebrew or the Greek

Through time in other weaves

other languages

Sounding the same struggle.

 

The door is opening

Come, watch me weave

I am mending as my grandmother used to.

Join me with your tools

In this a woman’s labor

Each new weave, better teaches us the old.

 

Don’t be afraid,

Come, take the passion fruit

Ripe and ready

Come Eat my Roses

Dive into the face o f Love

Touch the blood of passion

As it drips from the cup.

 

© Louisa Calio 2016

*A longer version of this poem was first published as “Cassandra’s Visions” In The Eye of Balance New York: Paradiso Press, 1978.

See( Meet Mago Contributor) Louisa Calio